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Ver la versión completa : Las más curiosas maneras de llegar a competir en coches (by RBR)



red5isalive
08/03/2014, 21:51
http://image3.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655637_4/0010/1/800/533/4/fabien-barthez-gt-racing.jpg

(http://image3.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655637_4/0010/1/1200/800/4/fabien-barthez-gt-racing.jpg)© DPPI










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The most unusual career paths into motorsportBy Tom Bellingham on 3 March 2014 in Motorsports (http://www.redbull.com/en/motorsports/discipline-tag/1331602903033/motorsports)

RedBull.com looks at some of the strangest ways people have gotten into motorsport.



Karting is the normal route into motorsport but not everyone does things by the book. RedBull.com (http://www.redbull.com/motorsports) looks at the drivers with rather more unusual paths into motorsport.



enlargehttp://image3.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655542_3/0010/1/700/466/3/patrick-dempsey-le-mans-2013.jpg

(http://image3.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655542_3/0010/1/1200/800/3/patrick-dempsey-le-mans-2013.jpg)Patrick Dempsey at Le Mans© DPPI

Patrick Dempsey – Acting to Endurance RacingKnown by most as Dr Derek Shepherd in Grey’s Anatomy, many may not know that Patrick Dempsey has now left his acting career behind to focus on motorsport. The actor has recently raced in some of the biggest endurance races on the planet including the 24 hour races at Le Mans and Daytona.
Luckily with the wallet of a Hollywood actor in his pocket, Patrick Dempsey didn’t have to worry too much about securing a drive and instead created his own team.
At the 2013 Le Mans 24 Hours, Dempsey Del Piero-Proton (Yes that’s World Cup winning footballer, Alessandro Del Piero) finished fourth in the LMGTE-AM class, with Patrick Dempsey himself behind the wheel of a Porsche 911 GT3.



enlargehttp://image2.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655714_5/0012/0/59/672/1898/3436/700/5/fabien-barthez-gt-racing-podium.jpg

(http://image2.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655714_5/0012/0/59/672/1898/3436/1200/5/fabien-barthez-gt-racing-podium.jpg)Fabien Barthez on the podium with Sebastien Loeb© DPPI

Fabien Barthez – Football to GT RacingFabien Barthez won just about everything in football but when the French World Cup winning goalkeeper retired in 2007, he decided to swap his goalie gloves for racing gloves.
After a difficult start to his racing career, Fabien Barthez went on to win the 2013 French GT Championship and share a race track with fellow Frenchman, Sebastien Loeb (http://www.redbull.com/en/motorsports/athletes/1331574674720/sebastien-loeb) during the French round of the FIA GT Series.



enlargehttp://image1.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655488_2/0010/1/700/466/2/adam-malysz-2014-dakar-rally.jpg

(http://image1.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636655488_2/0010/1/1200/800/2/adam-malysz-2014-dakar-rally.jpg)Olympic medallist Adam Malysz now races the Dakar© Kin Marcin/Red Bull Content Pool

Adam Malysz – Olympian to DakarIt doesn’t get much different, conditions wise, from the Winter Olympics to the Dakar Rally (http://www.redbull.com/dakar), but that’s the exact career step, ski jumping star, Adam Malysz (http://www.redbull.com/en/motorsports/offroad/athletes/1331579236943/adam-malysz) took in 2012. The Polish Olympian swapped his four Olympic medals for four wheels, competing in the toughest rally in the world, Dakar.
Adam Malysz has competed in the last three Dakar rallies finishing 37th, 15th and 13th respectively.



enlargehttp://image2.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636656290_6/0010/1/700/466/6/slim-borgudd-f1-abba.jpg

(http://image2.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636656290_6/0010/1/1200/800/6/slim-borgudd-f1-abba.jpg)ABBA drummer Slim Borgudd raced in F1© DPPI

Slim Borgudd – ABBA to Formula OneAfter a short-lived career as a drummer, which including work on several ABBA tracks, Sweden’s Slim Borgudd decided to take a chance on motorsport.
After working his way up the motorsport ladder, ATS offered Slim Borgudd a drive for the 1981 Formula One season, and a sixth place at the British Grand Prix was the best his career had to offer before the money, money, money ran out.



enlargehttp://image3.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636656687_7/0010/1/700/466/7/jann-mardenborough-gp3-racer-red-bull.jpg

(http://image3.redbull.com/rbcom/010/2014-03-01/1331636656687_7/0010/1/1200/800/7/jann-mardenborough-gp3-racer-red-bull.jpg)Jann Mardenborough will race in GP3 this year© Nissan

Jann Mardenborough – Gaming to GP3We’ve all dreamed we’d become racing drivers when playing our favourite racing games like Gran Turismo, but that’s exactly what Britain’s Jann Mardenborough (http://www.redbull.com/en/motorsports/f1/stories/1331634555930/jann-mardenborough-career-gallery) did, winning GT Academy and earning his chance to become a professional racing driver.
After success in Endurance racing, Jann Mardenborough will compete in this year’s GP3 championship with Arden Motorsport and will join an intensive driver development programme with Infiniti Red Bull Racing (http://redbullracing.com/).


http://www.redbull.com/en/motorsports/stories/1331636656131/unusual-motorsport-career-paths

red5isalive
13/03/2014, 21:22
Rudolf Uhlenhaut: Supreme engineer

Submitted by Andy Hallbery (http://www.motorsportretro.com/author/andy-hallbery/) on April 10, 2012
http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-the-test-driver-2.jpg (http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-the-test-driver-2.jpg)
Imagine if Adrian Newey made changes to his Red Bull Racing design, then strapped himself into the car to see if they worked, and tested it quicker than Sebastien Vettel. That’s what happened in the 1930s-50s at Mercedes-Benz.
Rudolf Uhlenhaut was that man. Not only was he a talented, gifted and visionary designer and engineer, but he was pretty quick behind the wheel too.
http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-Jenks-Moss-Mille-Miglia-55.jpg (http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-Jenks-Moss-Mille-Miglia-55.jpg)
Drivers who benefited from Uhlenhaut’s talents included Juan Manuel Fangio, Stirling Moss, Karl Kling and Hans Herrmann. The face of Mercedes at the time was race director Alfred Neubauer. In an interview in 2000 with Mercedes-Benz, Kling highlighted Uhlenhaut’s skills, and not just his engineering ones.
“Uhlenhaut was the real race director,” remembered Kling. “He was much better at setting up procedures such as, for instance, the schedule for tyre changes. He was absolutely loyal, a man with polite and cultured behaviour and with a real personality.”
While the public persona of Mercedes was Neubeauer, Uhlenhaut quietly got on with the work, developing the cars .While they were vastly different people, they had tremendous respect for each other. In his autobiography in the late 1930s, Neubauer wrote: “As the 1937 season got underway we at Mercedes realised that the W25’s failure was mainly due to construction errors. A young genius put the finishing touches to our car, and so far he is the only constructor to successfully steer on a Grand Prix circuit at full speed as well.”
That 1937 car was the famous W125, meticulously developed by Uhlenhaut to take on the Auto Unions. He did thousands of miles testing at the Nurburgring Nordschleife. During one test he lapped three seconds quicker than Fangio, and admitted that: “I can drive rather fast.” That was about all his modesty would allow. He also was quickest in testing at Monza, but racing never appealed to the engineer. However his driving skills benefitted the team as a whole as he could translate personal his feelings into improvements.
His unique career never transpired into racing. He once said he wasn’t a fan of racing anyway, and was much happier on a motorcycle.
Uhlenhaut was Mercedes through and through. If his blood wasn’t red, it was most likely silver. He started working for the Three Pointed Star in Stuttgart in 1931, and retired in 1972, his career naturally altered because of the politics of World War 2. He rose to Director of Automobile Development – projects he was responsible for which included many iconic road cars, like the Gullwing 300 SL.
http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-300-SL-gullwing-.jpg (http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-300-SL-gullwing-.jpg)
Quiet and unassuming, Uhlenhaut was more interested in pushing boundaries, making the race cars faster, the road cars unique. After an incredibly fruitful life, and a 41-year career with Mercedes-Benz, and 17 years of retirement, he passed away in May 1989.
Very special thanks to Mercedes-Benz Motorsport (http://www3.mercedes-benz.com/mbcom_v4/us/motorsport/en.html)
Images: Mercedes-Benz Archive
By Andy Hallbery (http://www.motorsportretro.com/2012/04/author/andy-hallbery/http:/), follow @hallbean. Follow @MotorSportRetro (https://twitter.com/#!/motorsportretro) on Twitter. Like us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/MotorSportRetro)

http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-the-test-driver-2.jpg (http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-the-test-driver-2.jpg)
Imagine if Adrian Newey made changes to his Red Bull Racing design, then strapped himself into the car to see if they worked, and tested it quicker than Sebastien Vettel. That’s what happened in the 1930s-50s at Mercedes-Benz.
Rudolf Uhlenhaut was that man. Not only was he a talented, gifted and visionary designer and engineer, but he was pretty quick behind the wheel too.
http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-Jenks-Moss-Mille-Miglia-55.jpg (http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-Jenks-Moss-Mille-Miglia-55.jpg)
Drivers who benefited from Uhlenhaut’s talents included Juan Manuel Fangio, Stirling Moss, Karl Kling and Hans Herrmann. The face of Mercedes at the time was race director Alfred Neubauer. In an interview in 2000 with Mercedes-Benz, Kling highlighted Uhlenhaut’s skills, and not just his engineering ones.
“Uhlenhaut was the real race director,” remembered Kling. “He was much better at setting up procedures such as, for instance, the schedule for tyre changes. He was absolutely loyal, a man with polite and cultured behaviour and with a real personality.”
While the public persona of Mercedes was Neubeauer, Uhlenhaut quietly got on with the work, developing the cars .While they were vastly different people, they had tremendous respect for each other. In his autobiography in the late 1930s, Neubauer wrote: “As the 1937 season got underway we at Mercedes realised that the W25’s failure was mainly due to construction errors. A young genius put the finishing touches to our car, and so far he is the only constructor to successfully steer on a Grand Prix circuit at full speed as well.”
That 1937 car was the famous W125, meticulously developed by Uhlenhaut to take on the Auto Unions. He did thousands of miles testing at the Nurburgring Nordschleife. During one test he lapped three seconds quicker than Fangio, and admitted that: “I can drive rather fast.” That was about all his modesty would allow. He also was quickest in testing at Monza, but racing never appealed to the engineer. However his driving skills benefitted the team as a whole as he could translate personal his feelings into improvements.
His unique career never transpired into racing. He once said he wasn’t a fan of racing anyway, and was much happier on a motorcycle.
Uhlenhaut was Mercedes through and through. If his blood wasn’t red, it was most likely silver. He started working for the Three Pointed Star in Stuttgart in 1931, and retired in 1972, his career naturally altered because of the politics of World War 2. He rose to Director of Automobile Development – projects he was responsible for which included many iconic road cars, like the Gullwing 300 SL.
http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-300-SL-gullwing-.jpg (http://cdn05.motorsportretro.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/M-B-Rudy-300-SL-gullwing-.jpg)
Quiet and unassuming, Uhlenhaut was more interested in pushing boundaries, making the race cars faster, the road cars unique. After an incredibly fruitful life, and a 41-year career with Mercedes-Benz, and 17 years of retirement, he passed away in May 1989.
Very special thanks to Mercedes-Benz Motorsport (http://www3.mercedes-benz.com/mbcom_v4/us/motorsport/en.html)
Images: Mercedes-Benz Archive

red5isalive
13/03/2014, 21:22
El link de la última noticia es

http://www.motorsportretro.com/2012/04/rudolf-uhlenhaut-supreme-engineer/